Breast Cancer Awareness – October & Every Month

This is the time of the year where we bring awareness to a disease that has plagued our society for decades. The types of cancer has grown, and the number of diagnoses has increased. The question I ask is why? How is it that in one of the most advanced countries in the world, millions of people are still dying of this disease? We have advanced in science, technology, space travel, architect, and so many other fields of study including medicine, but have yet to find a cure for cancer.

In 1951, A Black woman named Henrietta Lacks died of cancer. Something miraculous happened during the final stages of her battle with this disease. Her cells began to grow outside of her body from the scars of the unsuccessful surgeries she had, to eradicate the cancer that was growing inside of her. Those cells began to reproduce themselves intact. Unbeknownst to her family, scientists began to study and experiment with her cells, and have made major breakthroughs in medicine because of it. In vitro fertilization, vaccines for polio, hepatitis, and corona. Yet, we still don’t have a cure for cancer.

I have personal experiences with this disease. A few years ago, my mother was diagnosed with cancer in her uterus. She was instructed to go to another facility (that her health care didn’t cover), to have a procedure done to remove the cancer. Since she couldn’t afford the cost of that procedure, she decided to lean on her faith in God that she would be healed. One year later, she was rushed to the hospital, because she was bleeding profusely from her vagina. My siblings knew that something else was going on, because our mother was 68 years old, and had already been through menopause.

I remember vividly the tone in my brother Andrew’s voice when I called him, which made me ask him, what’s wrong? That’s when he told me that for the past year, our mother hid the fact that she had cancer. And, if it wasn’t for her being rushed to the hospital, we wouldn’t have found out. Fortunately, for her the cancer did not spread, and she was scheduled to have that same procedure a month later to remove the cancer from her uterus. The surgery was a success. I’m happy to report that a year later, she is doing well.

Unfortunately, this isn’t the fairytale ending for too many people. My sister Michele Gardner is in the battle of her life as we speak with this deadly disease at the young age of 51. I talk to her as much as i can just to uplift her spirits, because she’s going through chemotherapy for the second time. The pain and the fatigue has impacted her professional and personal life tremendously for more than a year now. I pray that she doesn’t become another statistic like my cousin Go-Go, who we just lost earlier this year. Her last words to me over the phone was: “You have to hurry up and come home, so I can get me some hugs and kisses from you, because I’m not going to be here that long.” I promised her that I would. Needless to say that I wasn’t able to live up to my words.

In my opinion, the problem is government, and big corporations approving and selling us products for profit that they know is killing us. I hear certain politicians claiming America first when it comes to tariffs, the outsourcing of jobs, immigration, and other things, but what about the health of its people? Why don’t all lives matter when it comes to healthcare? There needs to be more oversight, and provisions on government agencies, and corporations that support the poisoning and killing of American citizens. We must become more vigilant with our elected officials, and hold their feet to the fire. And, we must become more conscious about the products we use and consume, because our future depends on it.


Mpaka Halafu (Swahili for until next time)

Demetrius Brasher!
A.K.A
Muhammad The God!